Monday, February 15, 2021

Looking to buy a loft w a Keith Haring mural in it?

 Loft for sale in NY that contains a mural done by Keith Haring when an SVA student.

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/tribeca-loft-keith-haring-mural-1942947

 



 

Friday, February 5, 2021

Forget winter blues w these summer-y works of Art!

 Forget the snow, look at these images of summer by artists! Warmer weather is around the corner (sorta)!

See if you can name the artists!









(Van Gogh, David Hockney, Wayne Thiebaud, Keith Haring, Edvard Munch, unknown, Wayne Thiebaud, Claude Monet)

Monday, January 18, 2021

Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Wayne Thiebaud at 100

 One of the gallery guy's favorite artists, Wayne Thiebaud, nears his 100th birthday.

Saw a show of his work in NY in 2012 (reviewed here), and I've never before or since walked out of an exhibition feeling so happy because of the art. Something about his palette and subject, just so much fun to look at and you can't help but smile.

 




Friday, November 6, 2020

RIP Elizabeth Rosso, Sohotel Artspace

 I received an email from Catherine Testorf of Insight Artspace that Elizabeth Rosso, who she partnered with at Sohotel Artspace in NYC, recently passed away.

I met Elizabeth at their booth in Miami at the art fairs, I think it was 2012 . We talked at length about the artists they were showing, the art fairs and New York. She was cool, very outgoing and we hit it off right away. I gave her my card for The Gallery Guy blog as well as one for my personal work website, and ended up showing several pieces in 2013 at their gallery, Sohotel ArtSpace, on Broome St. in NY.  Elizabeth was very into fashion and travel, and she wanted to show my "hair" paintings during Fashion Week. It was a wonderful experience, including sales and great exposure, and I also got to meet Catherine and artist Esther Rosa. Later, I also showed w them at the Affordable Art Fair in NY.

My condolences got to Elizabeth's husband and family.

 

Elizabeth Rosso, me, Catherine Testorf


Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Great Kurt Vonnegut story


Saw this posted on Facebook, it's wonderful & want to share it. (above: Kurt Vonnegut, writer)

In 2006 a high school English teacher asked students to write a famous author and ask for advice. Kurt Vonnegut was the only one to respond - and his response is magnificent: “Dear Xavier High School, and Ms. Lockwood, and Messrs Perin, McFeely, Batten, Maurer and Congiusta:
I thank you for your friendly letters. You sure know how to cheer up a really old geezer (84) in his sunset years. I don’t make public appearances any more because I now resemble nothing so much as an iguana.
What I had to say to you, moreover, would not take long, to wit: Practice any art, music, singing, dancing, acting, drawing, painting, sculpting, poetry, fiction, essays, reportage, no matter how well or badly, not to get money and fame, but to experience becoming, to find out what’s inside you, to make your soul grow.
Seriously! I mean starting right now, do art and do it for the rest of your lives. Draw a funny or nice picture of Ms. Lockwood, and give it to her. Dance home after school, and sing in the shower and on and on. Make a face in your mashed potatoes. Pretend you’re Count Dracula.
Here’s an assignment for tonight, and I hope Ms. Lockwood will flunk you if you don’t do it: Write a six line poem, about anything, but rhymed. No fair tennis without a net. Make it as good as you possibly can. But don’t tell anybody what you’re doing. Don’t show it or recite it to anybody, not even your girlfriend or parents or whatever, or Ms. Lockwood. OK?
Tear it up into teeny-weeny pieces, and discard them into widely separated trash recepticals. You will find that you have already been gloriously rewarded for your poem. You have experienced becoming, learned a lot more about what’s inside you, and you have made your soul grow.
God bless you all!
Kurt Vonnegut
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
When I was 15 I spent a month working on an archeological dig. I was talking to one of the archeologists one day during our lunch break and he asked those kinds of “getting to know you” questions you ask young people: Do you play sports? What’s your favorite subject? And I told him, no I don’t play any sports. I do theater, I’m in choir, I play the violin and piano, I used to take art classes.
And he went WOW. That’s amazing! And I said, “Oh no, but I’m not any good at ANY of them.”
And he said something then that I will never forget and which absolutely blew my mind because no one had ever said anything like it to me before: “I don’t think being good at things is the point of doing them. I think you’ve got all these wonderful experiences with different skills, and that all teaches you things and makes you an interesting person, no matter how well you do them.”
And that honestly changed my life. Because I went from a failure, someone who hadn’t been talented enough at anything to excel, to someone who did things because I enjoyed them. I had been raised in such an achievement-oriented environment, so inundated with the myth of Talent, that I thought it was only worth doing things if you could “Win” at them.